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17 DEC 2019

Your career starts when you get chartered, assessor was told

Amie Silverwood

Amie Silverwood

Content Manager - Communications and Media

Toronto, Canada

RICS

Seven years ago, one of Daniel Josiah’s colleagues suggested he become an assessor with RICS. “He said, you’re kind of suited to it, as a mentor,” recalls Josiah, a senior-level quantity surveyor based in Oakville, Ontario, Canada.

Josiah, now a trained assessor, has supported candidates working on their APC in the Quantity Surveying and Construction Pathway. “Just as mentors helped me to come through the APC process, I can do the same for others. It’s a good feeling when you’re able to give back to the profession,” says Josiah, who also currently acts as a mentor for two APC candidates at his company as well as having acted as a counsellor for numerous others. “I always encourage candidates to read through the guidance notes that RICS provides, and to thoroughly understand the APC process. This way, candidates will train and prepare themselves to the standards required of a chartered surveyor and not to simply get through the process,” he says.

Originally from the U.K., Josiah trained as a quantity surveyor while studying commercial management part-time for five years, followed by a post-graduate diploma in quantity surveying, before obtaining his RICS qualification. “A mentor told me: your career starts when you get chartered,” he says, laughing. “I thought to myself, what have I been doing for the past six years? But now I understand what he meant. Going through the APC process and structured training, I was developing my competencies and learning how to manage clients.” After he graduated and was chartered, he moved to Canada with his wife who lived in Toronto.

Josiah is now a director of contracts and commercial at Lakeland Consulting Inc., a consultancy company focused on commercial management, including dispute resolution. He loves the variety his work provides: “I deal with different professionals including owners, contractors, subcontractors, legal counsel, and others in the whole construction supply chain and each has a different perspective.” This includes working on different stages of construction projects: “We could be called at any time in the project life cycle. Each day could be different.”

As a firm, Lakeland is regulated by RICS. “This gives our clients assurance. For those clients who do not know about RICS and regulation, we educate them about what it means and how it could benefit them.” The RICS qualification is also an asset on job applications. “When I receive a resumé from someone who is chartered, I ask myself, can I put them in front of a client?  The answer is probably, yes, as they would have been advising clients prior to achieving chartered status.”

While RICS is not as well known in Canada as in the U.K., Josiah believes their reputation is rising as is the profession of quantity surveying. He has helped with organizing continuing education seminars for quantity surveyors and other construction professionals in the Greater Toronto Area that are joint events with the RICS and the Canadian Institute of Quantity Surveyors, also often attended by members from the Project Management Institute (PMI) and Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering (AACE) International. “Events like this have raised the profile of RICS,” explains Josiah.

Daniel Josiah
Daniel Josiah

Quantity Surveying in the Americas

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Amie Silverwood

Amie Silverwood

Content Manager - Communications and Media

Toronto, Canada

RICS

Amie Silverwood is the Content Manager – Communications and Media for RICS in the Americas.

Read more from Amie